Richard Johnson Design

urban continuity - guidelines for public use and wayfinding

2012

Wayfinding can be defined as spatial problem solving. It is knowing where you are in a building or an environment, knowing where your desired location is, and knowing how to get there from your present location.

Programatic investigation:

Space Design for Public Assembly

Entrances

Spatial Organization

Signage Systems

Exhibits and Collections

Services and Concessions

Interior conditions

Building Codes

Egress and accessibility

Fire corridors/Safety

Museum Codes- Exhibits and Display

Signage and Signage Hierarchy

Accessibility of Exhibits

Furniture

Wall Installation

Interior Build-outs

Temporary Installations

Circulation-Space of Flows-Urban Metaphors

Locations and Paths

Number of Branch Regions

Complexity of Branch Regions

Route Complexity

Location of Information Access Regions

Steering and Locomotional Structure

Districts

Streets

Connectors

Landmarks Major Nodes

Freeway and Frontage roads

Boulevards

Local Streets

Trails

Narrow Spaces

Interstitial Spaces

Court Yards

Rest Areas for Adults

Rest Areas for Children and Toddlers

Wall installations

Furniture

Demo Areas (Built in)

Demo Areas (Pop-Up)

Exhibition Storage

Café Seating

Café Carts

Benches, Stools and Rest areas

Ephemeral Conditions - The Invisible Envelope

The hidden Logic: patterns of movement or spatial organization that characterizes a place and serves as a framework for the way finding system.

Light

Views

Enclosed Spaces (Dark Spaces)

Massing and Grouping

Installation and height

Timing, frequency and flow

Narrative and story telling

N/A

300,000 sqft

San Francisco, CA

research